Colo. School of Mines School of Petroleum Newsletter 2014, Page 20

Colo. School of Mines School of Petroleum Newsletter 2014, Page 20

RESEARCH PROFESSOR LETTERS

WINTERFELD CONTINUED

Modeling CO2 flow and storage is an intensely computational endeavor, crunched by our cluster computer, EMGCluster. We upgraded EMGCluster this year, doubling the number of nodes from 16 to 32, increasing the number of processors from 256 to 640, and switching to Infiniband for inter- processor communication. These upgrades have greatly increased the cluster’s speed and memory, allowing us to run much larger simulations.

Baby panda in incubator; not shown is the policeman nearby ready to

enforce the sign in any language whatsoever

I have also been working on a CNPC (China National Petroleum Corporation) project for developing a simulator that couples reservoir flow and hydraulic fracturing. This simulator, like the CO2 models above, solves the equations governing both fluid flow and geomechanics. A trip to China was included in the project, and my wife Amy and I went there last summer where I presented a workshop to CNPC on running our hydraulic fracturing simulator. We had a wonderful time and visited the Great Wall north of Beijing and the Research Base of Giant Panda Breeding in Chengdu.

AL SAMI

interact with the sophomore and senior students in many different ways to share what I know, with them and learn from them.

Another splendid part of my professional life in CSM is working with the brilliant grad students that I learn from, not to mention the great faculty and staff that I work with in PE department.

Al speaking at the U.S. House of Representatives

Often we enter in the discussion with the students regarding their concerns about the future of the oil industry. The instable and recent fluctuated oil price in particular, can be felt from their expressions. Despite public perception, lower oil price could slow down the production and cause less drilling, which is against the core policy of the new administration for increasing the domestic production. Importing the foreign oil resonated from the lower price of the oil and less profit for domestic producers could bump up the already-inflated unemployment rate to the next level. Could this cause less number of students for our department? Yet, to be determined.

Needless to say, CSM’s PE Department is playing a significant role in sending numbers of highly capable and knowledgeable young engineers to the oil industry. This is as the direct result of the wealth of knowledge and capability of the educators that PE Department poses.

In every minute of the past eleven years, I’ve been proud to be a part of this system. Mostly, appreciating the opportunity to

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