Alfred W. Eustes

Alfred W. Eustes

FACULTY LETTERS

BRATTON CONTINUED

currently being used in the teaching of petrophysics at CSM. This is the same software used globally by Shell, bp, and many other operating companies. It is also used globally by Schlumberger, Baker Atlas and Weatherford. Thus, CSM students and faculty have the same tool as the industry at large to solve the complex petrophysical problems facing the industry today.

Hiking in the Mt. Evans area

On a personal note, I look at these tools we have today and the formidable problems we have yet to solve, and I wish I was 23 years old all over again. With the current software and the knowledge gain over the last 4 decades, what will we be able to come up with tomorrow? I left academia after earning a MS degree in Physics in 1977. I’m now continuing my education at CSM working for a doctorate in Geophysics. This is going to be fun!

Fly-Fishing on the Big Horn in Montana

Off campus, I’m involved with the Colorado Mountain Club. I continue to participate in group hikes to see the wonderful mountains Colorado has to offer. I also volunteer to help teach Colorado Mountain Club’s Wilderness Trekking School. This class extends over several weeks and teaches students how to climb our tallest mountains. We cover simple things like how to return hydrated. We also cover more advanced topics such as navigation using map and compass, survival skills and traveling safely over snow. I very much enjoy meeting new people and hiking and fly-fishing in our wildernesses.

Fly-fishing for Coho in Alaska

ALFRED W. EUSTES

This has been the year of the sabbatical. This academic year, I spent it working on research activities, running two faculty search committees, and traveling on an SPE Distinguished Lecturer tour. I will start with the latter, first.

Susan and I at Brooks Falls, Alaska

I started the tour in sunny Alaska in September. I went a week earlier with Susan to enjoy the wilds. Visiting Alaska in September is the time to go. The leaves are turning a gorgeous autumn hue, the tourists are sparse, and there was no snow. Plus, the various tourist rates were lower than in summer! Susan and I landed in Anchorage and drove up to the University of Alaska, Fairbanks, my Mother’s alma mater and where I graduated from high school. I first gave my talk, “Extraterrestrial Drilling: How on Earth can Martian Drilling Help Us?” to the students and faculty there. We returned to Anchorage to give the same talk to the SPE and AADE sections there in a joint session in a movie theater (which was a first for me). Then, Susan wanted to see bears so we went to Homer,

6